Dawn Redwood – metasequoia

A couple years ago, at one my regularly scheduled medical checkups, my GP told me he had saved some wood for me. It was a Dawn Redwood shrub, which he had planted several years previously, but which had become unattractive.  When he cut it down, he decided the wood was too attractive to send to the landfill, so he saved it for me.  I was quite honored.

This tree has an interesting background. Scientists had seen fossil evidence of it, but thought it was extinct.  Then, in the 20th century, a valley in China was found where the tree was in existence.  Within a decade, it had been exported all over the world as an ornamental. Today, although the tree is in no danger of going extinct, it’s native habitat is considered to be threatened from industrialization and population growth.

The tree loses all it foliage in the fall, however it is coniferous. The foliage turns pink before it falls. The pink color is where the name Dawn Redwood is derived.

I have the opportunity to finish a few pieces from this wood, from a fairly large bowl down to a few pens. Here are some pictures. The first 7 pictures are of the most recent bowl. This bowl was sold at a craft fair in the fall of 2017.

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The next few pictures were of the first bowl I made from the Dawn Redwood. This bowl was sold on-line in the fall of 2016.

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One of the first things I made from this wood was a small lidded jar. The lid of  the jar is spalted maple and the knob on the lid is black walnut.  I gave this piece to my GP to thank him for the gift of wood.

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Buckthorn bowl

A friend from church gave me a bunch of buckthorn sometime back.  He is interested in learning to turn it as well so he and his wife came over last weekend to see how I do things.  First we turned a chunk between centers to show him how to do that.  Then they expressed an interest in seeing how I turn a bowl so we began this bowl.  They ran out of time and had to leave so I went ahead and finished it out.

This piece of wood has some lovely graining in it.

Both on the outside…

…and in the inside. The diameter of this bowl is about 5-1/2 inches, and it stands about 2 inches or so high off the table.

I gave the bottom a little different treatment than I usually do.

And I put a couple coats of wipe-on-polyurethane on it and let it dry.  After the poly was dry I buffed it out. The couple that gave me the wood stopped by my booth at a craft fair yesterday (Saturday, 12/1). I gave them the bowl.